best low carb apple puree

Fall has just started – and what’s fall without fresh apples? So what better time to cook your own delicious low carb apple puree? This recipe uses low-sugar apple varieties and cooks them with low carb sweetener erythritol, lemon juice, cinnamon and vanilla powder. Your apple sauce pot will smell like apple cake or winter wine. And yet it is an entirely guilt-free pleasure! I have been making it all the time ever since we harvested the first apples from our orchard. It’s refreshing and utterly satisfying every time I enjoy it – sometimes as it is, sometimes with cream or berries or both.

Making apple puree is super easy. Moreover, this yummy low carb apple puree recipe requires only five ingredients. You basically just chop up your apples, simmer them with a little bit of water and the other ingredients on medium temperature. Puree the mix when it is ready. You choose the texture. Anything goes from a chunkier, almost compote-style version to an entirely smooth puree – which just needs longer and more thorough pureeing. Enjoy your puree right from the pot (hot and very tempting!) or cooled down to room temperature.

a mason jar of home made apple puree on a grey table, with a dessert bowl and a few apples

Apples and carbs

A word about the carb load of different sorts of apples: Granny Smith has the lowest net carb content (mostly sugars) at around 11g per 100g apple serving. Alternatively, Boskoop, Fuji or Red Delicious apples still contain less sugar and fewer carbohydrates than sweeter varieties, at just under 15g of net carbs. We are lucky as we have a whole tree full of Boskoop apples in our orchard. Those are the ones I use most for apple sauce or crumble. More typical for apples would contain 25g.

three baskets of green summer apples on a garden bench

One more thing: Apple skins contain polyphenols, a powerful antioxidant which is about five times more prevalent in the skins than in the flesh. That’s why I keep the skins on – and I recommend that you do that as well. The boiling process softens and breaks them, and they disappear if you puree long enough. I usually keep a few smaller chunks in my apple puree so there will be a few small pieces of skins as well, but I am fine with that. It adds some taste and texture. If you don’t like skins at all, peel them off – but keep in mind to weigh your apple load after the peeling.

Summer and autumn apples

Having an orchard now ourselves has been fantastic – and yet also a whole new world with pressures: Ripe fruits scream Harvest Me Now! into our faces, and we had to collect sour cherries and summer apples within the first couple of days after our arrival here. The summer apples we have in the orchard are mostly green, with white flesh, with crispy thin skins and not very sweet – they are ideal for a tasty low carb apple puree. Same as a boskoop variety that ripens a little later.

freshly harvested red apples in a rubber basket on the grass

Whereas summer apples have to be consumed quickly, September and October varieties can be stored throughout the winter. One condition: The apple has to be intact. Windfalls cannot be stored as they are most likely somewhat damaged. But then, windfalls are perfect for making all sorts of delicious things: Apple puree, apple crumble, apple jelly. We even make our own apple wine! Just generally cut out all putrid spots and wormholes.

How to make low carb apple puree

Making apple puree is pretty straightforward. Sit down and chop your apples. I did most of this work outside when it was still warm, as it takes a little while – especially when using windfalls, as you have to carefully examine every apple. Submerge the apple pieces in water to which you add a splash of lemon juice. This prevents browning.

Once you finish chopping, rinse your apples once more to wash off all unwanted remnants of kernels and the like. Put a pot on the stove, and add apples and water. The rule of thumb here is to add 1 part of water to 10 parts of fruit. I am using 2 kilograms here, but the size of your pot (and the number of jars at hand) is your limit. As it is so easy, you can also make smaller amounts.

apple pieces in a pot, ready to be cooked

Put your stove on medium heat, and once your mix is bubbling, add erythritol, lemon juice, cinnamon and vanilla powder. That’s it! Just keep stirring regularly and lower the heat. Your apples mixture should be simmering, not boiling wildly.

After 20-25 minutes, the apples have softened and start to fall apart. Whenever they look like on the picture below, they are ready!

cooked apple pieces in a pot, with a wooden spatula

Now, pull the pot off the stove and grab your hand blender. Puree the apples right in the pot. Keep going until you reach the desired texture. And done! Pour apple puree into your mason jars, and scrape out the pot and enjoy the hot puree! So good.

If you sterilise the mason jars with boiling water before filling in the apple puree, it will last for several weeks. Otherwise, put your jars into the fridge to extend their storage time beyond a few days. They will last up to 2 weeks if your jars seal well. They never do in my home, though, as we eat it up too quickly for that!

How to enjoy it

Apple puree is super versatile. You can eat it on its own, use it as topping for your breakfast yogurt or enjoy it with a dollop of whipped cream or home made keto vanilla ice cream.

For a plant based option, top apple puree with cashew cream, which is easily home made in no time. Just check my recipe here.

Add blueberries or finely chopped dark chocolate, and you have a delicious dessert.

a dessert bowl with apple puree, cashew cream, cashew nuts and blueberries on a wooden table

And if you have come in the mood for apples, try other delicious low carb recipes from around the blogosphere:

Low carb apple pie

Cinnamon apple mug cake

Or my own apple crumble recipe from this blog


I love eating my summer or Indian summer desserts outside. But beware, it is still wasp season! Wasps like sweet fruity desserts as much as you do! As you can see from this picture – they were all over the place when I photographed this recipe.

two wasps exploring a bowl of apple puree with cashew cream

But now enjoy your home made apple puree! And if you like this recipe or have additional yummy serving ideas for apple puree, let me know!


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a mason jar of home made apple puree on a grey table, with a dessert bowl and a few apples

best low carb apple puree


  • Author: Christiane

Description

Delicious low carb apple puree! Super easy to make with keto sweetener and only five ingredients – including the apples


Scale

Ingredients

Makes two large mason jars

2 kg of chopped apples, seeds and stems removed, but skin on

200ml water (a little under 1 cup for recipe as originally written)

1 cup erythritol or other granulated low carb sweetener

juice of 1/2 lemon

1 tsp cinnamon powder

1/2 tsp vanilla powder


Instructions

  1.  Chop your apples as described. You can use damaged apples from windfalls as well if you generously cut out putrid spots or wormholes. Keep skins on as they are full of healthy nutrients!
  2. Put your apples in a pot, add the water and put to medium heat.
  3. When the mix is boiling, add erythritol and spices. Stir well and lower temperature. Simmer your apple mix for 20-25 minutes on low heat, regularly stirring. If your mix stops simmering, turn up the temperature a little. But it should not boil wildly. If the temperature is too high, pieces may stick to the bottom of the pot towards the end.
  4. When the apple pieces have softened and start to fall apart, remove the pot from your heat sauce. Blend the mix inside the pot into the desired texture with your hand blender.
  5. Pour your apple puree into the prepared mason jars. If you sterilise the mason jars with boiling water before filling in the apple puree, it will last for several weeks. Otherwise, put your jars into the fridge. Unopened, they will last up to 2 weeks if your jars seal well.

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